Space and Cyber Security Resources

Presentation by Amb (Ret'd) Paul Meyer
Senior Fellow, The Simons Foundation
Space Security 2016 Conference - Sustaining the Momentum: the Current Status of Space Security
Palais des Nations
Geneva, Switzerland
 

Chapter 8: "Outer Space and Cyberspace: A Tale of Two Security Realms"
contributed by Amb. (Ret'd) Paul Meyer, Senior Fellow, The Simons Foundation

From "International Cyber Norms: Legal, Policy and Industry Perspectives"
Anna-Maria Osula and Henry Rõigas (Eds.)
NATO CCD COE Publications, Tallinn 2016

 

 

Permission to make digital or hard copies of this publication for internal use within NATO and for personal or educational use when for non-profit or non-commercial purposes is granted providing that copies bear this notice and a full citation on the first page.  Any other reproduction or transmission requires prior written permission by NATO CCD COE.

 

 

Presentation by Paul Meyer, Senior Fellow, The Simons Foundation
Space: Obstacles and Opportunities, Canada-UK Colloquium
Glasgow, UK
November 20-21, 2015

Space Security Index 2015 is the twelfth annual report on developments related to safety, sustainability, and security in outer space, covering the period January-December 2014.  It is part of the broader Space Security Index (SSI) project, which aims to improve transparency on space activities and provide a common, comprehensive, objective knowledge base to support the development of national and international policies that contribute to the security and sustainability of outer space.

          SPACE SECURITY INDEX 2015 - Executive Summary

For more information and to order copies of the Space Security Index Executive Summary, please contact SSI Project Manager, Anna Jaikaran, at Project Ploughshares.  The full report will be available for purchase in Autumn 2015 at www.spacesecurity.org.

The definition of space security guiding this report reflects the intent of the 1967 Outer Space Treaty that outer space should remain open for all to use for peaceful purposes now and in the future:  

"The secure and sustainable access to, and use of, space and freedom from space-based threats."

The Space Security Index is a research partnership made possible by financial and in-kind support from The Simons Foundation; Project Ploughshares; Erin J.C. Arsenault Trust Fund at McGill University, Faculty of Law; Institute of Air and Space Law at McGill University, and the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University.

 

The views expressed in the Space Security Index represent those of the experts engaged throughout the process and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Government of Canada or the other partner organizations of Spacesecurity.org.

Commentary by Paul Meyer
Published by OpenCanada.org - Canadian International Council
December 31, 2014

Space Security Index 2014 is the eleventh annual report on developments related to safety, sustainability, and security in outer space, covering the period January-December 2013.  It is part of the broader Space Security Index (SSI) project, which aims to improve transparency on space activities and provide a common, comprehensive, objective knowledge base to support the development of national and international policies that contribute to the security and sustainability of outer space.

SPACE SECURITY INDEX 2014 – Full Report

For more information and to order copies of the Space Security Index report, please contact SSI Project Manager, Cesar Jaramillo, at Project Ploughshares: cjaramillo@ploughshares.ca.
 

The Space Security Index is the first and only annual, comprehensive, and integrated assessment of space security.  Based on eight indicators of space security, it provides background information and in-depth analysis on key trends and developments in the space field.  The project seeks to provide a fact-base of trends and developments in space security based on primary, open source research. It also includes an annual assessment of the status of space security based on a consultative process engaging a broad range of stakeholders.

The objective of the Space Security Index is to facilitate dialogue on space security challenges and potential responses by providing the necessary facts and focus to inform an important debate that has become unnecessarily polarized.

The definition of space security guiding this report reflects the intent of the 1967 Outer Space Treaty that outer space should remain open for all to use for peaceful purposes now and in the future: 

The secure and sustainable access to, and use of,
space and freedom from space-based threats.


The Space Security Index is a research partnership between the Institute of Air and Space Law at McGill University, The Simons Foundation and Project Ploughshares.   The project is made possible through the generous support of the Institute of Air and Space Law at McGill University, the Erin J.C. Arsenault Fund at McGill University, the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University, the Project Ploughshares and The Simons Foundation.

by Paul Meyer
Simons Papers in Security and Development No. 38, July 2014
School for International Studies
Simon Fraser University

By Amb. (Ret'd) Paul Meyer,
Senior Fellow, The Simons Foundation
and Adjunct Professor of International Studies and Fellow in International Security, Simon Fraser University
Simons Papers in Security and Development No. 38/2014
School for Interantaional Studies, Simon Fraser University
July 2014